Bad “Good” Bile Acids and Gut Microbiota Dysbiosis in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Mice and Humans Are Not the Same

Stanislav Sitkin (Coresponding Author), Juris Pokrotnieks

Research output: Contribution to journalLetterpeer-review

Abstract

The effects of deoxycholic acid (DCA) on the intestinal microbiota, bile acid (BA) metabolism, and intestinal epithelium can be influenced by various factors. Depending on the specific conditions, DCA can be “bad” (proinflammatory) or “good” (anti-inflammatory). Mouse models of colitis show an increase in conjugated BAs and gut dysbiosis, including DCA-related dysbiosis, with a significant decrease in bile salt hydrolase (bsh) gene-containing taxa. Human patients with inflammatory bowel disease demonstrate, primarily, a decrease in bile acid-inducible (bai) gene-containing taxa and a deficiency in secondary BAs, suggesting their anti-inflammatory role.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)925-927
Number of pages3
JournalDigestive Diseases and Sciences
Volume66
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2021

Keywords*

  • Bile acids
  • Deoxycholic acid
  • Gut dysbiosis
  • Inflammatory bowel disease
  • Intestinal inflammation
  • Intestinal microbiome
  • Ulcerative colitis

Field of Science*

  • 3.2 Clinical medicine

Publication Type*

  • 1.1. Scientific article indexed in Web of Science and/or Scopus database

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