Bioreactor-free tissue engineering: Directed tissue assembly by centrifugal casting

Vladimir Mironov, Vladimir Kasyanov, Roger R. Markwald, Glenn D. Prestwich

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

12 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Casting is a process by which a material is introduced into a mold while it is liquid, allowed to solidify in a predefined shape inside the mold, and then removed to give a fabricated object, part or casing. Centrifugal casting could be defined as a process of molding using centrifugal forces. Although the centrifugal casting technology has a long history in metal manufacturing and in the plastics industry, only recently has this technology attracted the attention of tissue engineers. Initially, centrifugation was used to optimize cell seeding on a solid scaffold. More recently, centrifugal casting has been used to create tubular scaffolds and both tubular and flat multilayered, living tissue constructs. These newer applications were enabled by a new class of biocompatible in situ crosslinkable hydrogels that mimic the extracellular matrix. Herein the authors summarize the state of the art of centrifugal casting technology in tissue engineering, they outline associated technological challenges, and they discuss the potential future for clinical applications.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)143-152
Number of pages10
JournalExpert Opinion on Biological Therapy
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2008

Keywords

  • Centrifugal casting
  • Hyaluronan
  • In situ crosslinkable hydrogel
  • Synthetic extracellular matrix
  • Tissue engineering

Field of Science

  • 2.6 Medical engineering
  • 3.4 Medical biotechnology
  • 3.1 Basic medicine

Publication Type

  • 1.1. Scientific article indexed in Web of Science and/or Scopus database

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