Clinical characterisation of rota virus infection associated with most commonly circulating genotypes in children hospitalised in children's university hospital: A cross-sectional study in Latvia

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Abstract

In developed and developing countries, most cases of acute gastroenteritis in children are caused by viruses, and rotaviruses are known as the leading cause. The aim of our study was to estimate the main circulating serotypes of rotavirus before the introduction of routine immunisation in Latvia, and to search for their possible correlation with clinical symptoms and circulating genotypes. A cross-sectional study was carried out among children who had been hospitalised in the Children's Clinical University Hospital from April 2013 to December 2015. Genotyping was done for 462 stool samples. Among G/P combinations, the most predominant genotypes were G4P[8] (61.3%), G9P[8] (12.4%) and G2P[4] (10.0%) in children of age < 5 years, G4P[8] (45.5%), G2P[4] (18.2%), G9P[8], G3P[8], and G1P[8] (9.1%) in children of age > 5 years. There was a statistically significant correlation (p < 0.05) between clinical signs (vomiting, dehydration, chronic diseases) and G1P[8] and G8P[8] genotypes. Infants infected with genotype G4P[4] had a statistically significant negative correlation with severity of acute gastroenteritis episodes (p < 0.05). We detected nine different rotavirus G genotypes, and two different P genotypes. G4P[8], G9P[8], and G2P[8] were predominant. We observed correlation between the dominant genotypes and clinical manifestations of rotavirus infection.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)312-316
JournalProceedings of the Latvian Academy of Sciences, Section B: Natural, Exact, and Applied Sciences
Volume73
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • rotavirus
  • gastroenteritis
  • genotyping
  • children
  • clinical characterisation

Field of Science

  • 1.6 Biological sciences
  • 3.2 Clinical medicine

Publication Type

  • 1.1. Scientific article indexed in Web of Science and/or Scopus database

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