Human Bocavirus 1 Infection in Hospitalised Children with Lower Respiratory Tract Infection

Inga Ziemele, Anda Vilmane, Santa Rasa, Man Xu, Klaus Hedman, Maria Söderlund-Venermo, Dace Gardovska, Zaiga Nora-Krukle, Modra Murovska

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractpeer-review

Abstract

Objectives
Human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1) is one of the most common respiratory viruses that is currently
accepted as a pathogen, causing upper and lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs) in children. Clinical
symptoms of HBoV1 infection range from mild to life-threatening respiratory illnesses. The aim of
this study was to identify the presence of HBoV1 DNA and determine HBoV1-specific IgM and IgG
antibodies in hospitalized children less than five years of age with LRTI, and to describe the clinical
characteristics associated with acute HBoV1 infection.
Methods
In this study, 102 children, aged 28 days to 60 months, were included and treated as inpatients
for presumptive LRTI. Blood sample and nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) were collected from each
enrolled patient. NPAs underwent HBoV1 NS1-PCR. HBoV1 serology was done by an enzyme immunoassay
(EIA).
Results
HBoV1 DNA was detected in 35.3% (36/99) of the NPA samples. The mean age of patients positive
for HBoV1 DNA in NPAs was 25.3 months (range 6 to 59 months).
HBoV1-IgM antibodies were detected in 78.9% (15/19) of HBoV1-DNA positives and in 18.6%
(19/102) of all patients, most frequently in patients aged 13 to 24 months (32.4%, 12/37). Patients aged
28 days to 12 months (n = 25) were all negative for HBoV1-IgM. Of the HBoV1-IgM positives, 63.1% (7/19),
and in total 64.7% (66/102), were HBoV1-IgG positive. HBoV1 IgG seroprevalence increased constantly
with age (p = 0.002). The mean age of the patients positive for HBoV1-IgG was 26.8 months (range 2 to
59 months). All HBoV1-IgM positive patients had fever, cough and abnormal auscultatory findings, and
73.6% (14/19) had chest wall in-drawing, 52.6% (10/19) had wheezing, and 42.1% (8/19) had tachypnea.
Conclusions
HBoV1 DNA is commonly detected in NPAs among hospitalized children with LRTI. Furthermore,
LRTI caused by HBoV1 occurs more often in children up to the age of 2 years.
Original languageEnglish
Pages173
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2019
EventRSU Research Week 2019 : Knowledge for Use in Practice - Riga, Latvia
Duration: 1 Apr 20195 Apr 2019

Conference

ConferenceRSU Research Week 2019
Country/TerritoryLatvia
CityRiga
Period1/04/195/04/19

Field of Science*

  • 3.1 Basic medicine
  • 1.6 Biological sciences

Publication Type*

  • 3.4. Other publications in conference proceedings (including local)

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