Interrelations of paranormal and pseudoscientific beliefs and critical thinking disposition among undergraduate medical students of RSU

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionpeer-review

Abstract

Magical and paranormal beliefs have been found in all cultures
and strata of society, including medical university students. Critical thinking
skills and dispositions are generally considered desirable outcomes of
the educational process. Nevertheless, there is the lack of conceptual
clarity about interrelations between the magical and critical thinking. Aim
of the study is to explore prevalence of magical, paranormal beliefs
and pseudoscientific beliefs among undergraduate medical students, as
well as to explore prevalence of critical thinking dispositions among
medical students and to assess interrelations and psychodynamics between
“noncritical” forms of thinking – magical, paranormal and pseudoscientific
beliefs, and critical thinking disposition. The results showed statistically
significant negative correlation between paranormal beliefs and critical
thinking disposition if students are put in optional situation between opposite
statements. If statements in assessment scales do not put respondents in
optional situation, their results do not show significant correlations
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSHS Web of Conferences
EditorsL. Vilka, J. Vike
Number of pages12
Volume85 (2020)
ISBN (Electronic)978-2-7598-9112-2
Publication statusPublished - 2020
Event7th International Interdisciplinary Scientific Conference SOCIETY. HEALTH. WELFARE
- Riga, Latvia
Duration: 10 Oct 201812 Oct 2018
Conference number: 7

Conference

Conference7th International Interdisciplinary Scientific Conference SOCIETY. HEALTH. WELFARE
Country/TerritoryLatvia
CityRiga
Period10/10/1812/10/18

Keywords

  • magical thinking
  • paranormal beliefs
  • pseudoscientific thinking
  • critical thinking disposition

Field of Science

  • 5.1 Psychology
  • 3.3 Health sciences

Publication Type

  • 3.2. Articles or chapters in other proceedings other than those included in 3.1., with an ISBN or ISSN code

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