Oregonin from Alnus incana bark affects DNA methyltransferases expression and mitochondrial DNA copies in mouse embryonic fibroblasts

Jelena Krasilnikova, Liga Lauberte, Elena Stoyanova, Desislava Abadjieva, Mihail Chervenkov, Mattia Mori, Elisa De Paolis, Vanya Mladenova, Galina Telysheva, Bruno Botta, Elena Kistanova

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Oregonin is an open-chain diarylheptanoid isolated from Alnus incana bark that possesses remarkable antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, inhibits adipogenesis, and can be used in the prevention of obesity and related metabolic disorders. Here, we aimed to investigate the effects of oregonin on the epigenetic regulation in cells as well as its ability to modulate DNA methylating enzymes expression and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) copies. Our results show that oregonin altered the expression of DNA methyltransferases and mtDNA copy numbers in dependency on concentration and specificity of cells genotype. A close correlation between mtDNA copy numbers and mRNA expression of the mtDnmt1 and Dnmt3b was established. Moreover, molecular modeling suggested that oregonin fits the catalytic site of DNMT1 and partially overlaps with binding of the cofactor. These findings further extend the knowledge on oregonin, and elucidate for the first time its potential to affect the key players of the DNA methylation process, namely DNMTs transcripts and mtDNA.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1055-1063
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Enzyme Inhibition and Medicinal Chemistry
Volume33
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2018

Keywords

  • Alnus incana bark
  • DNA methyltransferases mRNAs
  • mtDNA copy
  • Oregonin

Field of Science

  • 1.6 Biological sciences
  • 3.1 Basic medicine

Publication Type

  • 1.1. Scientific article indexed in Web of Science and/or Scopus database

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