Prevalence and associated factors of mental disorders in the nationwide primary care population in Latvia: a cross-sectional study

Elmars Rancans (Coresponding Author), Lubova Renemane, Anda Kivite-Urtane, Douglas Ziedonis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Mental disorders are common amongst patients in primary care. There are no published studies on the prevalence of mental disorders in primary care patients in Latvia. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the current prevalence of mental disorders in the nationwide Latvian primary care population and to study possible associated factors and comorbidity of mental disorders. Methods: A cross-sectional study within the framework of the National Research Program BIOMEDICINE 2014-2017 was performed at 24 primary care settings across Latvia. Adult patients seen over a 1-week time period at each facility were invited to participate in the study. Sociodemographic variables (age, sex, education, employment and marital status, place of residence, and ethnicity) were assessed onsite. A Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview assessment was conducted over the telephone within 2 weeks after the visit to the general practitioner (GP). Results: Overall, 1485 individuals completed the interview. The current prevalence of any mental disorder was 37.2% and was significantly greater in women. Mood disorders (18.4%), suicidality (18.6%) and anxiety disorders (15.8%) were the most frequent diagnostic categories. The current prevalence of any mood disorder was associated with being 50-64 years of age, female sex, economically inactive status, divorced or widowed marital status and urban place of residence, whilst any current anxiety disorder was associated with female sex, lower education, and single marital status; however, being of Russian ethnicity and residing in a small city were protective factors. Suicidality was associated with female sex, lower education, unemployment or economically inactive status, being divorced or widowed and residing in a small city. The comorbidity rates between mental disorders varied from 2.9 to 53.3%. Conclusions: High prevalence rates of mental disorders, comorbidity and certain associated socio-demographic factors were found in primary care settings in Latvia. This highlights the importance of screening for depression and anxiety disorders and suicidal risk assessment by GPs. The results are fundamentally important for integrative medicine, monitoring and promotion of mental healthcare at the primary care level, as well as for healthcare policy and development of strategic plans in Latvia.

Original languageEnglish
Article number25
JournalAnnals of General Psychiatry
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Apr 2020

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Mental disorders
  • Prevalence
  • Primary care

Field of Science

  • 3.2 Clinical medicine

Publication Type

  • 1.1. Scientific article indexed in Web of Science and/or Scopus database

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