Representation of interests: The “tautas panorāma” programme of latvian television voters discuss the work of the saeima

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Latvian citizens are characterised by a very low level of political activism. How can this be explained through an understanding of politics? Prior to the 2018 Saeima (Latvian parliament) election, voters were interviewed on Latvian television discussing the pronouncements of various members of parliament. The researcher explores the relationship between the comments of these voters and the way they feel their interests are being represented by the state’s law makers. Throughout the interviews, voters are critical of Saeima, yet they fail to clearly explain their interests. The generally agreed upon duty of MPs is to discover the general will of the people, and attempt to fulfil this will through law making. In Latvia, the concept of forming interest groups representing the desires of various groups of citizens to create public expressions of their opinions is not considered a viable resource for political action. The citizens being interviewed believe that they cannot expect to have their interests represented by Saeima and prefer individual strategies focused on non-political action.

Translated title of the contributionRepresentation of interests: The “tautas panorāma” programme of latvian television voters discuss the work of the saeima
Original languageLatvian
Pages (from-to)84-101
Number of pages18
JournalLetonica
Volume2020
Issue number42
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Discourse analysis
  • General will
  • Latvian politics
  • Political representation
  • Saeima

Field of Science

  • 6.1 History and Archaeology
  • 6.4 Arts (arts, history of arts, performing arts, music)

Publication Type

  • 1.1. Scientific article indexed in Web of Science and/or Scopus database

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